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Mar 27, 2012

New Pain-Free Needles Will Actually Stab You Twice

It's counter-intuitive, but a new syringe design could eliminate the pain when getting a shot by using two separate needles that work in quick succession. A technique that could be hard to accept for those who hate being pricked.

The first needle is actually considerably smaller than the second, and delivers a small amount of local anesthesia that numbs the skin around the entry point. Its inventor, Oliver Blackwell, claims the first injection feels akin to a fly landing on the palm of your hand. And by the time the second larger needle delivers its payload, the patient shouldn't feel a thing.

Not only does the new needle design cut down on the number of syringes needed if a patient does require an anesthetic before a shot, but it should also make life for those who have to perform their own injections—like diabetics—a little less agonizing. More here.

12 comments:

YeamieWaffles said...

That's good news, I guess since they are considered pain free. I hate injections so anything that makes it less painful is good in my eyes, here's hoping I get to avoid injections for a while until these are fully developed.

Tenment Funster said...

Nice, I don't midn being injected, but some people don't react well when stabbed by a needle.

R said...

Sounds like an interesting idea!

Stormtrooper said...

The current needles aren't so bad. You can get used.

Lower Back Pain Relief said...

WOW! This is very interesting.

[AguiLeon] said...

look interesting

Nathan said...

Huh, that is interesting. If I ever got diabetes or anything, I'd need this. I hate even the slightest bit of pain. ><

Trolske said...

Looks like a great invention.

Adam said...

I hate needles

annoymouse said...

Doesn't make it any less scarier though..

teganwilson said...

This is great news for me, last time I had a needle in me was an IV and it took about 2 minutes to get the thing in, with a nurse clamping my arm down to the bed. I must have pretty tough veins I guess lol. I have seen ones they use for vaccines, they're like a patch covered in tiny tiny spikes that snap off under the skin and dissolve, pretty nifty.

Jim said...

Great innovation! Wonder when this will be in use.