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Nov 25, 2011

Can Scientists Make a Battery That Will Survive 40,000 Charges?

The one problem with gadgets is power. Even if batteries start off long-lasting, after 12 months they start to struggle. But a new material might change that.

A team of researchers from Stanford have developed a new battery electrode that can survive 40,000 charge cycles. That's about a hundred times more than a normal Lithium-Ion battery, and enough to make it usable for somewhere between 10-30 years.

So how does it work? It's down to what it's made from: copper hexacyanoferrate. The structure of the material lets charge-carrying ions move in and out of the electrode easily, and it's extremely rugged, so it degrades at a much slower rate than Li-On batteries. That all means it can charge and discharge rapidly, and lasts for ages.
 
 

10 comments:

Adam said...

I have the same ones in the photo, and they definitively lose their strength after awhile.

aLH3x said...

they could do, but I think they won't realize them because those batteries would kill all the others (batteries).

Lot's Wife said...

Now they just need to invent a battery that lasts 10-30 years between charges.

R said...

This would be awesome.

Orang3 said...

For sure they can, but it's not a scientist problem but the battery companies who want you to buy more batteries.

aamedor said...

nice

Kid Shuffle said...

crazy!

Jupitertree said...

Wouldn't those batteries cost a ton of money to produce and buy?2222222222222222

Rawbhal said...

Looks pretty promising, I have a few posts about advances in technology on my blog, albeit a bit less on the cutting edge.

YeamieWaffles said...

That would be absolutely amazing although it would certainly be tough to secure and invent right? It's a great concept but it's a long while away I think.